How to Do a Half Snap
CRRC Home ] Up ] Join CRRC ] Calendar ] Getting Started ] Forecast ] Search ] Contact Us ]

 

What's New
About CRRC
Articles & Tips Index
CRRC EMail List
Flying Sites
Instructor Program
Links
Newsletter
Pictures
Weather

Home > Articles & Tips Index > Flying > How to do a Half Snap

[An online discussion from the IMAC email group]

From:    Don Szczur [dszczur "at" maranatha.net] 8/6/1999

OK, thanks for those who responded to my question. Here are the results, 75% say there should be no hesitation after the two half rolls and before the half loop, 25% say that there should be a hesitation, which would make the maneuver look smoother and better paced. If my memory stands correct from last year's masters, the judges meeting clarified that hesitations were ok where multi-component maneuvers were performed (for example, half loop followed by 1 1/2 pos snaps, another example would be half inside loop with 4 point roll following). This is as opposed to an "immelman" or "bunt". A solid agreement is definitely not universal among the IMAC community (or judges).

OK, next flying question. Half snap. What are the ideas/techniques out there to do this. My perception based on a couple of IMAC contests I have seen as well as practicing them myself is that it is hard to tell if its a half snap or just a half roll. Two of interest, of coarse, are half neg snap (coming down from 45 degrees inverted) to upright and half neg snap going vertical.

Ideas please respond

Thanks. Don Szczur


From:    Dick Hanson [dhmodels "at" concentric.net]   8/7/1999

I have played with the half snap - a lot-- and I honestly can say that the general run of judges can NOT tell a slightly pitched half roll from a snap and further - I would bet that the flyer who has the "fudged" maneuver down pat--will outscore the guy who used rudder -The amount of rudder input really can overcook this maneuver--so I am frankly puzzled as to how to tell a judge to evaluate it . I also would like a way to define it more easily--


From:   Roy S. Barrow  rbarrow "at" membank.com   8/7/1999

Dick, I would have to say the "general run of judges" as well as 98% of everyone but the pilot would be hard pressed to tell the difference. As long as the nose leaves the line of travel in two axis's there is no way to downgrade for a "slightly pitched" roll that I can determine. It is very difficult to downgrade based on depth of a snap UNLESS it is a very very obvious "fudge".


From:    Randy Brown [rabrown "at" execulink.com]   8/7/1999

Dick..I have been practicing this manuv also.. I hate it..but I'm having a real good laugh trying It.. anyway..I have judged many of advance thin year.. and I can tell you ever one that got anything higher then a 0 did use your rudder... Actually I have only seen I think one person that can actually do the half snap and still be on the line... do it without rudder and you can..

Another thing guys are doing is if there snapping Left.. they start to go right just when there about to snap left.. I like it when they do it..down grade<G> big time<G>

Randy


From:    Sam Monteleone [sjm "at" teleweb.net]   8/8/1999

1 point downgrade for every 10 degrees off a straight line entering the snap and exiting. All figures start and end with a straight line. But this is the flight path that is judged not the attitude of the plane. Snaps are usually judged by watching for the pitch change which has to occur either before or simultaneously with a yaw or roll change.

SAM

 


CRRC Home ] Up ] Join CRRC ] Calendar ] Getting Started ] Forecast ] Search ] Contact Us ]

Disclaimer